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As I have a number of exams coming up, I should be concentrating on revision, but when there’s a sunrise that starts like this…

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…and then finishes like this…
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Then the only thing to do is drop everything and get out on a bike with Beautiful Daughter.

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Unfortunately the sun had decided to give up after the morning performance and the day had gone back to being grey, but it was a novel feeling not to have to ride on snow spikes…

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And we found cows and horses, which made up for any deficiencies in the weather as far as the cute one was concerned.

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From the ever interesting ‘No Tech Magazine‘:

“The German-made Carla Cargo is a three-wheeled cycle trailer with an electric assist motor. It can be pulled by any type of bicycle (including a cargo cycle or an electric bike), and it allows you to carry heavy (up to 150 kg) and bulky cargo (a loading platform of 60 x 160 cm). Uncoupled from the bicycle, the Carla Cargo works as a hand cart for large or heavy loads. The vehicle weighs 40 kg including the battery, and has a range of 40 to 60 km”

It turns out that the company is based in Freiburg, not too far from Stuttgart, but a million miles away in terms if cycling infrastructure.

More details and a picture of the bike with a recumbent tandem here:

Electrically Powered Bicycle Trailer & Hand Cart (DIY)

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On the way back from work, taken at the same place as this picture and possibly a few minutes later in the day, and we now have real daylight. The ground is actually starting to dry off and the geese no longer have to swim to cross the farm yard.

Of course it snowed for several hours a couple of days ago, and there was ice on the window this morning, but at least we can now leave work without crashing into wheelbarrows and stray sheep.

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At first glance this may look like yet another random picture of the Xtracycle on its travels, but allow me to draw your attention to the orange bike in the background.

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That is a Yuba Mundo, a longbike similar to an Xtracycle, and clearly used as a family transport bike judging by the setup and presence on a tram stop bike rack on a cold and damp October morning, when ‘normal’ people would have used a car.

Despite having a reputation for being a stroppy rebel who goes out of their way to do everything differently to other people, it is very encouraging to know I’m not the only person trying to get around like this…

Bed onna Bakfiets

Once again, I am aiming for a niche audience here.

A while ago, the boys managed to break Youngest Son’s bed, which caused much consternation at the time, but I did finally manage to make a new side piece to replace the one that was broken. Because the bed uses mortise and tenon Joins, I had to transport the rest of the bed about five hundred metres up to the workshop during this process to fit the new section to the existing joins, then haul the lot down to the apartment.

As usual I spent some time massively over-thinking things before realising that all I needed was climbing ropes, blankets and wood clamps. The whole operation went pretty smoothly, so smoothly on fact that I forgot all about it until last night when I found the picture while desperately seeking a blog subject at the end of a quiet week…

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Bakfiets being a skip for the day. One of the jobs I’d been planning to do for some time was clearing out the cellar, in particular the smaller sized bikes which are lurking in every corner. Of course the appearance of Beautiful Daughter means the bikes need to remain in place for a while longer; not that I’m complaining, I hasten to add.

There’s still plenty of other stuff down there of course because as we all know cellars are breeding grounds for random and miscellaneous things with no obvious purpose, so last week I made a start on shifting some of the more obviously useless things like a broken bike frame and two large bags full of papers which have been there so long they may well be considered historical artifacts.

Expatriate life is full of glamour.

“Speed limit thirty kilometres an hour”…

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On a Bakfiets. Uphill.

You’ll be lucky.

Or: how to make a simple job more complicated.

1: Leave apartment to deliver letter, notice plastic ready for recycling. Take it downstairs.

2: Dither in hallway before deciding that as I’m using the Bakfiets, and I’ll be going through the garage, I’ll drop the plastic in the Bakfiets, take the Bakfiets out of the garage,  close the garage door, and transfer the plastic to the recycling bin, thus saving myself a trip of ooh, about ten metres.

3: Open garage door.

4: Drop the plastic in the Bakfiets, take the Bakfiets out of the garage,  close the garage door, ride off.

5: Reach top of hill. A couple of dog walkers look curiously into the Bakfiets. Realise why.

6: Ride 200m back down hill.

7: Transfer the plastic to the recycling bin.

8: Ride 200m back up hill.

At least I’d remembered to bring the letter. I guess I’ll go and cross out ‘multitasking’ as one of my skills on my CV…

We decided it was time for Beautiful Daughter to come on a bike ride with us. This caused much head scratching while I focused the remaining operable brain cells on a way to keep her baby seat from wobbling about in the Bakfiets.

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After massively over thinking things and sketching out wooden frames and other ideas, I remembered that the simplest solution is the best, and that we had a 200kg rated climbing rope that would work just fine. As long as I could still tie knots.

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About ten minutes later I had the seat tied down. unfortunately I’d also carefully tied the rope around the steering rod that runs under the bike. This meant that I could ride perfectly well as long as I didn’t have to turn any corners.

With some colorful language, another five minutes untying and retying the rope, and a total expenditure of €0,00 later we had this result. It is remarkable how the seat for smallest member of the family requires almost the entire Bakfiets.

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When we go out as a family these days, people notice. Here is the mothership with the satellites waiting outside the shops. The boys often lock their bike to the Bakfiets as it is heavier than the cheap cycle stands provided. The roof was to keep the wind out rather than any rain.

Beautiful daughter was a somewhat bemused at first, and gave the bakfiets a thorough inspection. Her brothers helped her to relax by by riding alongside and pulling faces. Inbetween she played with her cuddly toys before settling off to sleep.

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In flight entertainment was provided. She found the sight of Papa puffing up the hill more entertaining.

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Just to show I do get outside occasionally. The Xtracycle carrying the chisel and saw rolls from my workbench to my employers workshop.

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