Interesting as my current training may be, I am getting  bit fed up of sitting in lectures and writing stuff for exams, so it was a relief to be allowed outside to play complete a practical project.

The brief from the college was to go and find an organisation working with people with disabilities and ask if they need anything to help clients take part in the activities. I went with three other students to the city farm where I worked for eight months, who decided that what they’d like was wheelchair friendly entrance for the rabbit pen. “Wheelchair friendly” being defined as possible to just a wheelchair in and out without having to pull bolts or turn handles, in both directions, but without the rabbits escaping n the process.

The contraption above is what we came up with. As a wheelchair goes up the ramp and onto the platform, the weight presses the planks down, releasing the catch by the gate. The wheelchair can push through the gate which is hanging on those nifty sprung hinges you find on saloon doors in western movies, and when the wheelchair has gone through the gate swings shut, the platform springs up again thanks to two inflated wheelbarrow inner tubes hidden underneath, the door latches shut, and the rabbits are kept safely inside.

The plan was for the platform to be about ground level but we discovered the foundations to what looks like an artillery position right where we wanted to dig it out so it ended up rather higher. The ramp and barrier are by way of emergency solutions.


So far it seems to work. The gate opens and closes,  mass rabbit breakouts have been avoided.

The long drawn out and very boring process of getting German citizenship I’ve described before is continuing: we’ve had a request for a rather large amount of money and more copies of the documents we had to copy earlier. We have to take them to an office at some unspecified point in the future, so we are hoping this means we are coming towards the end of that one. Of course this means chasing different government offices who move at the usual speed of government offices everywhere…

Exams continue: you’ve all experienced them and they are as fun and exciting as way back when, so I don’t need to go on about that…

On the other hand I’ve got a project week this week, which means I can start a bit later and get to make stuff and call it work. My group has to make and design a gate that will open for a wheelchair without the user needing to undo a bolt or turn a handle, and close securely after they have gone through. This last bit is important because we are back at the city farm I worked at a couple of years ago, and the gate goes to the rabbit pen.

On top of this the weather is good at the moment and I can ride the Xtracycle to the farm, and not get muddy in the process, which reduces a lot of the potential grumpiness…

More exams loom. This week we have ‘Rechtskunde’ or law. We need to know the law for working with people with disabilities/psychological issues/refugees/young offenders et c,, what rights they have, including extra rights to protect them, and how to deal with different situations.Of course to do this we need to have a working knowledge of the law for everyone else.

It is very boring.

The picture above is my attempt at making it a bit more interesting and rearranging the information to help me remember it.

German speakers: I know “Rectskunde” should be “Rechtskunde”. Pencils don’t have a spellchecker, and by the time I noticed I’d filled in all the gaps…

I’ve been generally lazy about maintenance over winter, and for several weeks (probably months, but never mind) the back gears on the Xtracycle have been playing up, in particular the middle gears seemed to think clicking the lever was a suggestion, to be given some consideration and possibly followed. Eventually. It was one of those gradual problems that you get used to over time, which was why I’d not bothered about it much.

Then came several weeks when I almost exclusively used the commuter bike. For all its faults this has gears which change when I want them to, and the shock when I went back to the Xtracycle was enough that I finally got around to doing something about it.

That something was to remove the rear mech that came with the original Raleigh bike back in 1997, and which has survived all my mistreatment over the last 20 years, but which I was pretty sure had finally given up. Being me, I’d hoarded several replacements, including one from a ‘scrap’ bike a customer brought into our local bike shop many years ago. It took ten minutes to change it, plus about three days faffing about and putting it off.

This made very little difference, so I did what I should have done at first and cleaned out the outer tubing and replaced the brake cable. This got a result. The gears are still a bit iffy, but they usually change when told. Or within a couple of seconds, at least.

I’m wondering if the main issue is the over enthusiastic use of cable ties on the cable, but naturally now the bike is ridable again I’m ignoring the problem.

One of these years I really am going to get my act together and fix all the little problems on the bikes before winter, as well as greasing the bolts on important places so they don’t seize up in the salt spray. Places like the bolt holding the kickstand on the commuter bike, for example, so when it goes all wobbly I can just tighten it up without the hex key socket turning to mush and leaving me with a wobbly stand for the winter.

One of these years, but not last year. Hence the rather drastic maintenance seen above.

for the last few months I’d avoided using the stand by leaning the bike against handy walls, railings and conveniently placed motor vehicles, and jamming bike tubes under the frame, but the stand was starting to move towards the wheel while riding which could have interesting consequences, so this week I visited the City Farm I sued to work at, and attacked the bit of aluminium holding stand to frame with hammers, chisels and the Very Big Drill untill it finally gave way under the onslaught of blunt objects and foul language.

Then problem, it seems was that the bike doesn’t have a fitting on the frame for a stand, so it will eventually twist under use. I’m wondering if this is an excuse to get a two legged stand, but I know the real solution is getting myself organised enough to grease the bolts more often…

 

It’s one of my favourite times of the year again, when the weather department realises it is spring and suddenly we go from freezing cold and rain to sunshine, flowers, and very nearly not a needing a coat. This also means I can ride most of the way to college instead of using the tram, and thus avoid the centre with all its annoyances without getting too muddy.

Most of the route is on routes through the forest and across fields where cars are supposedly not allowed.They are therefore indifferently tarmacked or gravel, and used as a turning circle for tractors ploughing. (The local town once made a big thing about how they employed a sort of park ranger who apart from anything else should keep these roads clean, which gave us all a laugh).

Having mudguards helps of course, as well as an improvised mudflap which is surviving far longer than I dared hope, but it is good to know I can ride through the forest and not hit mud or puddles.

Which made last week just the wrong time for the owners of the local forest to decide to play with their big tractors, and close the routes to Stuttgart so they could mess up all the trails undisturbed. It gave the journey an extra edge of adventure, especially as they only reopened them when they’d made sure there were wheel ruts across the trails wider than some local cycleways.

Just a small reminder that for all the hot air, we don’t really consider bicycles to be a proper form of transport.

Meanwhile, our version of Stuttgart is developing, slowly…

The current lack of posts on this blog is because I can’t find the keyboard for paperwork. Several local government departments have demanded lots of official ie ‘expensive’ documents at the same time as Younger Son needs his passport renewing. As the UK governments increasing paranoia about furriners now extends to anyone who has contact with furriners, and I am to paperwork what an Ostrich is to competitive baking, so this is proving rather stressful, especially as I still have a couple of exams to prepare for.

It also makes for rubbish blogging.

On the other hand I have a place for the internship in September working in this theatre and arts centre which runs lots of programmes for people with Psychological issues, and with this theatre company which does drug awareness programmes in schools.

Even better, everything to do with organisation and insurance goes through college, so I get to play in the theatre and and the paperwork is someone else’s problem.

Updates will follow as soon as I dig my way out.

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The mural is getting there, slowly. The tiles in the foreground are complete and we’ve almost covered the wall colour on the rest of the picture.

We’re way beyond the alloted time for the project but the tutor is letting us continue. Probably because the alternative is a half-finished painting for the next eighteen months…

I’m also organising my work placement in September. It looks likely that I’ll get to work for three months in a theatre and arts centre based in an incredible art deco power station. The organisation also has a travelling company presenting theatre about drug awareness in schools.

The only thing that stops it from being perfect is that I’ll have to go into the centre of Stuttgart every day.

Never mind, you can’t have everything…

One of the best things about spiked tyres is the feeling you get when you swap back to normal tread again. Ah, the silence.

On the other hand, I discovered that the bell doesn’t work any more. I’m not sure how this happened. I mean, how do you break a bell? I didn’t use it much in winter because sensible people don’t go outside when it is below freezing, and anyway, the spikes sound like a truck driving on gravel so people heard them when I was some distance away.

So now I’m back to riding most of the way to college every day or so instead of sharing a tram with lots of dozy commuters. Of course that means I’m occasionally sharing the road with dozy drivers instead, but that may not happen for much longer because a community group in Stuttgart has brought a private prosecution against the Mayor of Stuttgart for “Körperverletzung mit Todesfolge”, which translates as “Actual bodily harm causing death”. This is on the basis that the pollution is reaching lethal levels and he’s doing stuff all about it.

Apparently fifty years of giving cars as much space as is conceivably possibly need and then some in a city surrounded by hills has resulted in The Mother of All Traffic Jams and a fug of pollution so far above the European Standardised ‘Danger, breathe out only’ levels that when the City Government tried their usual tactic of sticking their finger in their ears and shouting “Cars are safe, Cars are safe, stop talking about this la la la, can’t hear you” they had a coughing fit.

Who’d have thought it?

German law allows for the government to ban motor vehicles in places when pollution gets so thick citizens can surf on the top of it, so our government could legally stop through traffic tomorrow if they wanted, but that may annoy some Very Important Drivers and a certain large car company who like driving big trucks back and forth to deliver to their main factories.

All that happened so far is a rather pathetic advertising campaign to get people to use public transport at half price. This is having as much effect as you’d imagine.

It will be interesting to see what effect the legal proceedings have. So far we’ve been entertained by a number of entitled motorheads having tantrums and demanding that people who don’t like breathing particles ‘just move somewhere else, duh.’ so they can keep driving where they want. Bless.

Meanwhile a rather cleaner version of Stuttgart is emerging on the classroom wall

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As I have a number of exams coming up, I should be concentrating on revision, but when there’s a sunrise that starts like this…

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…and then finishes like this…
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Then the only thing to do is drop everything and get out on a bike with Beautiful Daughter.

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Unfortunately the sun had decided to give up after the morning performance and the day had gone back to being grey, but it was a novel feeling not to have to ride on snow spikes…

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And we found cows and horses, which made up for any deficiencies in the weather as far as the cute one was concerned.

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